Vitamin C

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin best known for its use in treatment of the common cold, though its efficacy is questionable, and likely low. it is also needed for a host of processes including tissue growth and repair, strength of capillary walls, lactation, and adrenal gland function. It is vital for the formation of collagen, the body’s structural substance. It promotes healing of wounds and is a powerful antioxidant.

Vitamin C sequesters free radicals in the body. It is replenished by antioxidant enzymes, and is often used as a reference drug in antioxidant research. Vitamin C’s structure allows it to act on neurology and depression, as well as interact with the pancreas and modulate cortisol. Its antioxidant properties mean vitamin C provides neuroprotective effects and benefits for blood flow. By protecting the testes from oxidative stress, vitamin C can also preserve testosterone levels.

Vitamin C is found in many fruits and vegetables, although citrus fruits are synonymous with vitamin C, the highest vitamin C content (per 100-gram serving) is found in guavas, kiwis, and bell peppers. Vitamin C is destroyed by heat, cooking foods destroys approximately 25 percent (or more) of the vitamin C present in foods. Alcohol consumption increases urinary vitamin C losses by nearly 50 percent, suggesting that higher intake might be required to prevent deficiency in regular or heavy drinkers, and many common drugs including aspirin and oral contraceptives may reduce vitamin C levels in the body.


People who smoke, consume alcohol, or have specific medical conditions commonly have higher vitamin C needs than healthy people. Smoking increases oxidative stress, which increases antioxidant requirements. Alcohol consumption increases urinary vitamin C losses by nearly 50 percent, suggesting that higher intake might be required to prevent deficiency in regular or heavy drinkers.

The Human Effect Matrix from examin.com summarises human studies to tell you what effects Vitamin C has on your body, how much evidence there is, and how strong these effects are.


Plasma Vitamin C - For the purpose of increasing plasma Vitamin C concentrations, orally supplemented Vitamin C appears to be the best decision (second only to intravenous vitamin C).

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